[toggle title=”QUICK STATS. CLICK TO VIEW QUICK STATS ON THIS LOCATION”]Built: 1908
Abandoned: 1986-1987
Location: South East Pennsylvania
Status: Privately Owned
Reason: Poor Treatments, Patient Abuse
Haunted: Yes

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Abandoned Pennhurst State School and Hospital located in Pennsylvania opened in 1908 as a school and hospital for the mentally ill and challenged individuals. Most of the patients admitted to Pennhurst were young children. They were either sent to Pennhurst as court ordered or parents would drop them off with no love and to move on. Pennhurst was suppose to help these children get back into society but that failed. As years went on, the campus became overcrowded. They had about 2000 more patients then the campus was suppose to handle. They were also very under staffed and the state would not give them a lot of money.

The patients were also abused physically and sexually. They would have their teeth removed if they bite, they would have fingers, toes, and jaws broken if they were bad. One patient lose an eye and another damaged. It turned into a place of abuse then a place of love and help.

In 1986, Pennhurst was ordered to close. A former patient once released went to court and sued Pennhurst for awful living and abuse. That patient won the case and Pennhurst was ordered to close. When it closed, most patients able to live on their own were released. A lot of those patients who are still alive live in the Spring City / Royersford Pennsylvania Area.

HERE ARE SOME PICTURES I TOOK WHILE THERE. CLICK ON THEM TO VIEW BIGGER

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2 thoughts on “Pennhurst State School & Hospital

  1. Steve wondering do you ever take anybody with you when you go exploring imery interested
    email me and ill give you more info
    Steve

  2. My uncle lived at Pennhurst from 1960 until it closed. He’s developmentally disabled. You mentioned that most of the patients here were sent out into the street. That may be true of the mentally ill patients, but most of the intellectually impaired individuals were placed in group homes. I went to visit my uncle at Pennhurst in 1983, and it was awful. I’ve had nightmares about the place for years, and could remember how the interior windows on my uncle’s dorm room looked like he’d been boxed up into a cage. One thing about Pennhurst is that the population was not segregated by disability, so people who had normal and above IQs, but were mentally ill and often violent, were housed with those who were very low functioning, often non-verbal, and unable to report abuse. On that visit to see my uncle, my mother left me alone in my uncle’s room while she took him to see the nurse to ask her something, and before she was even all the way gone from the room, his roommate had pinned me to his bed. Thankfully, someone came in as soon as I yelled for help, but that was a bad BAD place. It took years for my uncle to unlearn a lot of the behaviors he’d picked up from living there.

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